Avengers Disassembled

Avengers Disassembled

More specifically the writer of Avengers Disassembled,

Brian Bendis

Brian Bendis

Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, my client has been charged of writing a pointless story. The prosecution claims that he used cheap ploys to increase the sale of his work. In addition to the first charge, the prosecution also is asserting that my client ignored continuity when writing the story .The defense is prepared to answer all of these charges.

Evidence #1: The cheap ploys

Exhibit A: The death of Scott Lang

Exhibit B: Hawkeye's Death

The prosecution claims that  my client used the deaths of these two beloved characters as a cheap ploy to boost sales of Avengers Disassembled, and the defense has to say that this is Preposterous! Mr. Bendis felt that he had to kill these two characters off in order to show the grand scale of the story that he was producing. Each character represented a generation of Avengers and their deaths symbolized the death of those generations. My client’s job was to write a way for the Avengers to break up, and that meant the death of characters that felt special to the team. The Avengers weren’t just going to break up over a normal bad day. The only way for the break up to make sense was to give the Avengers the worst day imaginable. Sadly, that meant the deaths of Hawkeye and Ant-man.

The defense would like to assert that unlike normal comic book deaths, the deaths of Hawkeye and Ant-man had lasting effects. Ant-man has still not come back from the dead and his daughter, Cassie, constantly struggles to overcome the loss of her father. Hawkeye did come back from the dead but is constantly looking for answers to why he came back. He has become more of an interesting character since his death and revival.

Many people and the prosecution also act like the deaths of Scott Lang and Hawkeye are the first time the death of a character was used to sell a book. The truth of the matter is that this is more of a send off to the Avengers than the prosecution thinks.

If it pleases the courts, the Defense submits the following pieces of evidence, named Exhibit C-I.

Exhibit C: Avengers #14

Exhibit C: Avengers #14

Exhibit D: Avengers #112

Exhibit D: Avengers #112

Exhibt E: Avengers 113

Exhibt E: Avengers #113

Exhibit F: Avengers #136

Exhibit F: Avengers #136

Exhibit G: Avengers #117

Exhibit G: Avengers #177

Exhibit H: Avengers # 395

Exhibit H: Avengers # 395

Exhibit I: Avengers #402

Exhibit I: Avengers #402

What do these seven covers have in common other than being an Avenger cover? Simple, they all use death of a character as some sort of ploy to entice potential buyers. The funny thing is that these are just a few Avengers covers that feature this ploy. It should be noted these covers are from a different generation of Avengers.  The use of death as a ploy is as timeless as comics themselves, and if you consider yourself a purist, then by all means you should accept that death as a ploy is as traditional as caption boxes!

Evidence #2: Ignoring of Continuity

Exhibit C: Chaps Magic

Exhibit J: Chaos Magic

This is the prosecution’s strongest piece of evidence for the charge of “Ignoring Continuity”. The prosecution has stated that this outburst from Dr. Strange is false and even worse is that Dr. Strange has used Chaos Magic in the past. My client does admit that was a goof up on his side, but in his defense he was at the time relatively new to the mainstream comic universe of 616. The editors should have caught that goof and corrected, but they did not. If you are going to charge someone with the continuity errors, then charge the Avengers and Marvel editorial staff.  While the writer is partially responsible for the continuity, the truth is that they are incapable of knowing everything that has happened. The series was at 500 issues when my client took over the writing duties, and the series just had several reboots a few years before hand. It was impossible for my client to know what is still fact and what is no longer “cannon”. That is why the editorial staff is to blame for this fiasco.

The defense would like to state that if the fact is something that isn’t publicly known or decades old then it’s best to ignore any inconsistencies with the  past storylines. While it is ridiculous for dramatic changes, such as the “MJ/Peter Parker One More Day disaster” to be accepted, minor errors such as the “Chaos Magic” fiasco can easily be ignored.  The word chaos could have been swapped for anything else. My client chose that word for a reason only known to him. The defense believes that the prosecution should be charging the editorial staff with this crime and not Mr. Bendis.

The Defense Rests!

Thanks go out to BAC, TrixShot7, and Spiderman1989 over at TGWTG.com for suggesting the Prosecution aspects.

Sources for images:

The Avenger Covers:http://www.coverbrowser.com/covers/avengers Pretty awesome site that I recommend for anyone looking for classic Avenger covers.
Scott Lang’s explosive death: Avengers #500
Hawkeye’s death: Avengers #502
Dr. Strange’s Chaos Revelation: Avengers #503

Seriously though, the series is really hit or miss. Worth a read through if only to make sense of Bendis’ master story.

If you have suggestions for future In Defense Of articles send them to comicbookoverkill@gmail.com or comment below.

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